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All Topics | Topic "I just posted another WEAP-related paper: "Climate change impacts on the hydrology of a snowmelt driven basin in semiarid Chile""
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Author Message
Jack Sieber

Subject: I just posted another WEAP-related paper: "Climate change impacts on the hydrology of a snowmelt driven basin in semiarid Chile"   
Posted: 9/16/2010 Viewed: 21762 times
See http://www.weap21.org/Publications for links to the paper and the authors.

Sebastian Vicuna, Rene D. Garreaud, and James McPhee, "Climate change impacts on the hydrology of a snowmelt driven basin in semiarid Chile," Climatic Change, doi:10.1007/s10584-010-9888-4, August 2010.

Abstract
In this paper we present an analysis of the direct impacts of climate change on the hydrology of the upper watersheds (range in elevation from 1,000 to 5,500 m above sea level) of the snowmelt-driven Limarí river basin, located in north-central Chile (30° S, 70° W). A climate-driven hydrology and water resources model was calibrated using meteorological and streamflow observations and later forced by a baseline and two climate change projections (A2, B2) that show an increase in temperature of about 3–4°C and a reduction in precipitation of 10–30% with respect to baseline. The results show that annual mean streamflow decreases more than the projected rainfall decrease because a warmer climate also enhances water losses to evapotranspiration. Also in future climate, the seasonal maximum streamflow tends to occur earlier than in current conditions, because of the increase in temperature during spring/summer and the lower snow accumulation in winter.

Topic "I just posted another WEAP-related paper: "Climate change impacts on the hydrology of a snowmelt driven basin in semiarid Chile""